Carsten Höller, Psycho Tank, 1999. Installation view, “Une exposition a Marseille,” Musee d’Art Contemporain, Marseille, France, 2004. Photo: © Attilio Maranzano

Carsten Hölle, Upside Down Mushroom Room, 2003

Carsten Hölle, Y, 2003. 960 lightbulbs, aluminium, wood, cables, electronic circuitry, light signs, mirrors, approx. 1300 x 860 x 320 cm

"Höller has created a world that is equal parts laboratory and test site, exploring such themes as childhood, safety, love, the future and doubt.  His pieces are designed to explore the limits of human sensorial perception and logic through carefully controlled participatory experiences.
The selected works emphasize the experimental quality of Höller’s work and reveal the complex universe of one of the most significant European artists to emerge in the past twenty years. Höller came to prominence alongside a group of artists in the 1990s including Maurizio Cattelan, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Pierre Huyghe, Philippe Parreno, and Rirkrit Tiravanija who worked across disciplines to re-imagine the experience and the space of art. Höller stands out among this group for the manner in which his installations drew on the history and method of scientific experimentation to destabilize the viewer’s perception of space, time, and the concept of self.”

installation

László Noémi: Az Óperencián innen és túl 

Alig várom, hogy valóra váljak. 
Megálmodott legyek, ne csak valódi: 
szeretnék istenien folytatódni, 
mint mesemondóknál a messzi tájak,

hogy még egy elképesztő rizshegyen 
vasakarattal átrágjam magam. 
Lassanként sehol sem ül a szívem, 
kis teste teljesen anyagtalan –

és nem tudom, hogy levegő vagyok, 
vagy gyertyafény, vagy mesebeli táj, 
hegyek omolnak, vagy csak csont ropog –
érteni nem, de figyelni muszáj.

poetry

Hartmut Skerbisch: 3D Fraktal 03/Hdd, 2003. Austrian Sculpture Park. 
"Hartmut Skerbisch once said that “sculpture is not a discipline of the fine arts.” So what is it? “The main theme of sculpture is man’s relation with himself.” This certainly applies to Skerbisch’s work, now spanning several decades, which he generates from socio-political and scientific influences rather than ostensibly aesthetic ones. Among other themes, Skerbisch has developed solar trees, an energy game, and sculptures based on geometric axioms. “3D Fraktal 03/H/dd" is a good example of the way Skerbisch works. The fundamental definition of the piece is best taken from an encyclopaedia: The term fractal (adjective or noun) was coined by Benoit Mandelbrot (1975) (Lat. fractus: broken, from frangere: break, break into pieces), and refers to natural or artificial shapes or geometric patterns with a high degree of self-similarity. This is for instance the case when an object consists of several smaller copies of itself."3D Fraktal 03/H/dd" is a sophisticated construction where five cubes grow out of one cube respectively, producing a total of 156 cubes whose generations furthermore create a sense of dynamics through the diagonal rotation of their axes: the cubes seem to spring up like proverbial mushrooms, and one almost expects them to grow in size. It is characteristic of Skerbisch’s work that even the theory of chaos leaves nothing to chance. It is also not a coincidence that the footpath runs right through the work: this type of art does not require or want distance." Walter Titz

Hartmut Skerbisch: 3D Fraktal 03/Hdd, 2003. Austrian Sculpture Park. 

"Hartmut Skerbisch once said that “sculpture is not a discipline of the fine arts.” So what is it? “The main theme of sculpture is man’s relation with himself.” This certainly applies to Skerbisch’s work, now spanning several decades, which he generates from socio-political and scientific influences rather than ostensibly aesthetic ones. Among other themes, Skerbisch has developed solar trees, an energy game, and sculptures based on geometric axioms. “3D Fraktal 03/H/dd" is a good example of the way Skerbisch works. The fundamental definition of the piece is best taken from an encyclopaedia: The term fractal (adjective or noun) was coined by Benoit Mandelbrot (1975) (Lat. fractus: broken, from frangere: break, break into pieces), and refers to natural or artificial shapes or geometric patterns with a high degree of self-similarity. This is for instance the case when an object consists of several smaller copies of itself.
"3D Fraktal 03/H/dd" is a sophisticated construction where five cubes grow out of one cube respectively, producing a total of 156 cubes whose generations furthermore create a sense of dynamics through the diagonal rotation of their axes: the cubes seem to spring up like proverbial mushrooms, and one almost expects them to grow in size. It is characteristic of Skerbisch’s work that even the theory of chaos leaves nothing to chance. It is also not a coincidence that the footpath runs right through the work: this type of art does not require or want distance." Walter Titz

Martin Walde:Fridge Rose. Villa Arson. 2003. 
"For years, Martin Walde has been developing an inimitable, innovative, and successful praxis that includes the exhibition visitor in his dynamic process of creating installations. His works have clearly expanded the concept of sculpture, and his way of working with materials has completely altered our notions of material and space: sculpture can also be regarded as behavior in space. His works are no longer fixed in a gallery, but are instead mobile, multifunctional, and free of context as well as naturally interactive. Thus, on very different levels—aesthetic, material, and intellectual—Walde succeeds in shedding light on various issues associated with the production of art. By making room for coincidence and the viewer’s own will, the artist allows them to playfully participate in his energetic work processes."
more: http://derstandard.at/1326504351972/Ausstellung-Vom-Verfluessigen-und-Aufloesen
 http://www.inside-installations.org/research/detail.php?r_id=547&ct=movement

Martin Walde:Fridge Rose. Villa Arson. 2003. 

"For years, Martin Walde has been developing an inimitable, innovative, and successful praxis that includes the exhibition visitor in his dynamic process of creating installations. His works have clearly expanded the concept of sculpture, and his way of working with materials has completely altered our notions of material and space: sculpture can also be regarded as behavior in space. His works are no longer fixed in a gallery, but are instead mobile, multifunctional, and free of context as well as naturally interactive. Thus, on very different levels—aesthetic, material, and intellectual—Walde succeeds in shedding light on various issues associated with the production of art. By making room for coincidence and the viewer’s own will, the artist allows them to playfully participate in his energetic work processes."

more: http://derstandard.at/1326504351972/Ausstellung-Vom-Verfluessigen-und-Aufloesen

 http://www.inside-installations.org/research/detail.php?r_id=547&ct=movement

installation